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M.Div. at NGU Prepares Christians for Real-World Ministry

North Greenville University is now enrolling students in its new Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree program.

The M.Div. program aims to equip students to be effective in evangelism and Christian leadership, spreading the gospel and teaching the Bible through missions and discipleship.

“There is an emphasis on biblical principles in every course,” says Dr. Larry McDonald, dean of the NGU Graduate School of Christian Ministry. “We believe [students] learn more than just what’s in the textbook. There’s really an application of [their] faith in all aspects of [their lives].”

Pairing theological study with practical application, the M.Div. at NGU is a 75-hour degree that prepares students for ministry positions such as pastors, chaplains, and missionaries. All students in the program must complete seven core courses, and then they can choose their remaining courses from within the program’s four track options in church revitalization, discipleship, missions, and pastoral ministry. Each track provides students with a variety of opportunities to gain ministry experience in different settings.

NGU’s Graduate School of Christian Ministry emphasizes a practical approach to its M.Div. and encourages students to apply in-class learning to their current ministries, as well as to prepare for future service.

“All of the courses are designed to integrate an actual ministry experience,” says McDonald. “The North Greenville M.Div. is one that provides exposure to the classical disciplines, but [it is also] very hands on, practical oriented. A student develops ministry skills needed in order for him to be in a ministry context and provide leadership for it.”

In their smaller-than-average classes, M.Div. students at NGU engage with academically qualified professors who have experience in church and parachurch ministries. The faculty provide an authentic community, where students can prepare for leadership in ministry and also develop spiritually on a personal level.

The Graduate School of Christian Ministry offers traditional, on-campus classes at NGU’s new Greer campus. Students can also complete their degrees through online and hybrid options, making the program more flexible and easily accessible for adult students and professionals.

The M.Div. degree program helps graduate students develop skills in ministry and a biblically sound theological framework for teaching Scripture. Students learn to apply biblical principles in ministry and gain the tools necessary to be effective agents of the Great Commission.

“We want [students] to develop their own character and their own spiritual walk,” says McDonald. “But we also want to teach them how to relate that to a lost world, a world in need of the gospel message of Christ.”

For more information about NGU’s new M.Div. degree, visit ngu.edu/mdiv.

         

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