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We ask you to play a proactive role in helping keep NGU's community a safer place for all individuals. Monitoring yourself through self-screening will increase the chances of detecting the possible presence of COVID-19, and early detection helps reduce the spread. People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. According to the CDC list, people with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

We encourage you to contact the NGU clinic during regular hours, or use the self-checker tool provided by the CDC to help guide you in making decisions and seeking appropriate medical care.  NGU students, faculty, staff, and contractors who have been exposed to, or tested positive for, COVID-19 should complete the NGU COVID-19 reporting form or call Campus Security at 864-569-9689.

It is essential to understand if you may be at a higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. According to the CDC, people with the following underlying medical conditions (at any age) are at an increased risk for severe illness:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
  • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 30 or higher)
  • Severe heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Additionally, those with the following conditions may be at an increased risk for severe illness*:

  • Asthma (moderate-to-severe)
  • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Hypertension or high blood pressure
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines
  • Neurologic conditions, such as dementia
  • Liver disease
  • Pregnancy
  • Pulmonary fibrosis (having damaged or scarred lung tissues)
  • Smoking
  • Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder)
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus

*Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

 

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